Webcomic Workshop Podcast 73

Solving Webcomic Issues We All Face.

This podcast we discuss:

Drezz: I’ve recently begun work on a new comic project – this time, with a writer. Do you feel that having an artist/writer combo or team effort to produce comics produce better results (quality, timeliness, etc) or do they suffer the same fate and problems as single authors do.

Robin: I’m working on all of the development materials for “Wavemen”. Not just character turn-arounds, but also research into new inking styles and techniques. It made me wonder what you all consider the most important work on artwork and/or writing to do BEFORE you start actually working on the comic?

Dawn: I’ve felt burned-out and I’ve seen my writing suffering due to it, so I made the decision to take an extended hiatus. I’m running out my buffer thru Aug, and won’t return until 2015. At times (after only 3 weeks) I start getting jittery and want to jump back on the wagon– but I need to force myself to REALLY break away for a good long while so I have a truly fresh outlook. I recently took up softball to get out of the house and be active– doing something else I used to love as much as comics. Do you have other suggestions for ways to fully rejuvenate, get the gears turning, and reset my creativity?

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Posted in Featured News, Podcast.

3 Comments

  1. note to self : dont eat when listing to these podcasts ( i almost choked on a mint cause you crazy guys made me laugh) great as ever.

    as for the buffer thing 🙁 I’m posting daily without one.

    • I may have to put that as a disclaimer: “Eat at your own risk while listening.”

      I too for years did my comic the day or two before. I was doing 5 a week that way. Not sure how I did it now, but we somehow pull the energy from somewhere. 🙂

  2. Having the same/opposite issue as Drez.

    Im the writer, and I’ve hired an artist. Its very difficult to find that balance. Im having an issue with trying to have a positive critique. Luckily, my artist is terrific and I hardly ever have to go back and have him change anything.

    But I also have the fear of alienating him to the point of him wanting to leave the project. So far, thru dialogue between the two of us, that is just my apprehension and he does not feel that way, whatsoever.

    But the balance is a difficult thing to negotiate. Especially when distance is a very real issue (Oregon to Pittsburgh)

    Cory

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