Webcomic Workshop Podcast 78

WA_header-Workshop

Solving Webcomic Issues We All Face.

This podcast we discuss:

Listener Issue: How to handle a comic’s hiatus with your Patreon supporters. Plus we delve deeper into the overall process of how Patreon works.

Drezz: Formatting your comic for a mobile format. Is this the new wave for webcomics?

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Posted in Featured News, Podcast.

7 Comments

    • LOL! Nice Simpson’s clip! And Detroit has it’s moments… I can’t think of any, but I’m sure it does. 🙂

  1. So I’ve read webcomics on both my phone (Galaxy S5 so a decent sized screen) and on my computer… and maybe it’s because I’ve been reading webcomics for about 15 years, I will always prefer reading on a computer. I only read on my phone if I’m somewhere and I’m bored (I’ll just realize that hey, it’s Wednesday, that comic I read updates today/yesterday/a day I didn’t check/etc). Also since some webcomics often have fun things in their alt tags that can’t be read on a mobile device (tho some comics found a way around that…) having that rewards non-mobile users I think ;). But of course, I’m in the process of creating a webcomic myself, so I’m also in the creator category.

    However, I do also know that responsive design is basically the leading thing in web design right now, so having the elements of your page layout shift according to screen size, like Chris said, would/should alleviate some of those issues of people getting annoyed and leaving before reading the comic. It’s mostly just moving any sidebars to somewhere else so that the comic stays centered on the screen (best for long form comics, short form would have to switch to a vertical layout if originally in a horizontal one.) There is a comic I read that does this, and it makes it much easier to read as a result.

  2. It felt like the point you all were circling around but never really landed on is that there is a tendency for people to treat Patreon like Kickstarter, when in fact it is a completely different platform. Kickstarter is for funding a PROJECT. Patreon is for funding a PERSON.

    Somebody – it may have been Dave Kellett – said that his Patreon is basically “the reward for $1 backers is a thank you. the reward for $2 backers is two thank yous, etc.”

    And while it’s fine to offer rewards of a digital download here and there, and maybe a personalized something for high-tier backers, that’s really not the point. Patreon is set up to allow creators to collect money for the thing they’re already doing.

    • Beautifully said. I think we all need to adapt to, and understand, the project vs person distinction. Still not sure exactly how that translates to differences in mindset and approach, from either creator or patron perspective.

  3. Great workshop again, guys and girls!

    Is there any way you could link the article you referred to about the Patreon styles – monthly vs. content? The one written by JS Rowe?

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